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Australian cities that swear the most, Toowoomba ranked second

Australian cities that swear the most, Toowoomba ranked second

Australia, renowned for its laid-back culture and unique vernacular, has often found itself in the global spotlight for its colourful language.

Seeking to delve into the nuances of Aussie speech, Preply, a prominent global language learning marketplace, conducted a comprehensive survey across the country’s 22 largest metropolitan areas.

The objective? To uncover which city earns the coveted title of the “cursing capital.”

Australia and Cursing

Australia, renowned for its laid-back culture and unique vernacular, has often found itself in the global spotlight for its colourful language.

Seeking to delve into the nuances of Aussie speech, Preply, a prominent global language learning marketplace, conducted a comprehensive survey across the country’s 22 largest metropolitan areas.

The objective? To uncover which city earns the coveted title of the “cursing capital.”

Short Historical Context

The Land Down Under gained international notoriety in 2006 due to a tourism campaign featuring the phrase “Where the bloody hell are you?” The controversy surrounding the ad only served to highlight the Australian affinity for straightforward and friendly language within their cultural context.

The Survey

To discern where profanity is most prevalent, Preply surveyed 1,503 residents, exploring the swearing habits across diverse settings and demographic factors such as age and gender. The findings provide a unique glimpse into the linguistic landscape of Australia, revealing not only the cities that swear the most but also those where expletives are a rarity.

Key Findings:

  • Average Daily Swearing Frequency: On average, Australians engage in approximately 14 instances of swearing per day.
  • Cursing Capital: Bendigo emerges as Australia’s most profane city, with residents averaging a remarkable 21 swears per day. This Victorian city, known for its gold mining history and vibrant arts scene, may find its residents’ language more ‘colourful’ than offensive.
  • Least Profane City: Hobart claims the title of the least swearing city, with its residents using only 6 naughty words on average per day.
  • Demographic Trends:
    • The 16-24 age group leads in foul language, averaging 16 expletives per day.
    • Australian men tend to swear more, with an average of 16 times per day, compared to women who swear 13 times per day.
  • Swearing Hotspots: Driving, especially in Toowoomba, emerges as the prime setting for Australians to unleash their linguistic creativity, making it the city with the most verbally expressive motorists.

The Swearing Spectrum: Most and Least Profane Cities:

Preply’s survey uncovered that Bendigo, with its 21 swears per day, claims the crown as Australia’s swearing capital, closely followed by Toowoomba (18) and the Gold Coast (17).

The juxtaposition of these findings against the cities’ positive attributes, such as Bendigo’s rich history and thriving creative community, raises questions about the cultural context and intent behind the profanity.

As for the least swearing city, Hobart residents demonstrate remarkable restraint with only 6 daily expletives.

The factors influencing these linguistic variations remain intriguing, especially considering the generally idyllic weather conditions in Toowoomba and the Gold Coast.

Perhaps, for Australians, swearing serves as a means of expressing affection rather than venting anger or offending.

Comparing Aussie Swearing Globally:

For those curious about how Australia’s fondness for foul language stacks up internationally, Preply’s study on US cities reveals that Americans outpace Australians in daily swearing, with the USA averaging 21 instances compared to Australia’s 14.

On the other side of the spectrum, the Brits maintain a more reserved approach, swearing only around 10 times per day, which adds a layer of irony to their initial scandal over Australia’s infamous tourism campaign.

In the end, Preply‘s language survey not only sheds light on the diverse swearing habits within Australia but also sparks a broader conversation about the cultural nuances and perceptions surrounding the use of colourful language. Whether it’s an expression of affection or a moment of frustration, Australians certainly have a unique way of making their words heard.

Vic

Writer, biker and most of all a loving father and husband.